Botswana – Day 3 The Okavango Delta (Part 1)

Cars, boats and planes are not Dee’s favourite forms of transport.  This is because she is a little prone to motion sickness.  Why, therefore, did we book for a whole day excursion to the Okavango Delta, which could only be reached by light aircraft?  This was a question she was to ask herself a number of times as the day went on. For me, any uncertainty was more to do with whether it was going to be worth the money, as it was the most expensive holiday excursion we had ever signed up for.  To be honest, we decided to do it before we left England, because, as we were already going to be in Botswana, the Okavango Delta had to be visited.

Six of our party were going to do the trip on this day, with some others on the next day.  After an early breakfast we set off for Kasane Airport, to be ready to leave soon after 08:00  or so we thought.  When we got there it soon became clear that there was a problem.  There was no aircraft waiting.  The aircraft that had been scheduled to take us was still in Maun.  This left the tour manager frantically trying to sort it out.  There was an alternative as there was another pilot and plane at Kasane and maybe he could take us down, in fact, I think he agreed to, but he still had to have breakfast and check his aircraft over.  In the end, the pilot from Maun arrived and loaded us up.  We were over two hours late leaving on our expensive excursion.

The images in this post are of the trip down to Pom Pom Camp in the Okavango Delta, where we were to spend what was left of the day.  These photographs proved quite difficult to take so the image quality isn’t great.  The reasons were various.  Cramped position in the aircraft and vibration/turbulence meant that the ISO had to be increased a bit with some resultant noise.  Dust in the atmosphere also reduced the contrast.  Still, I think they are worth a look.

The first shot is the view back to the airport ‘terminal’ from the aircraft’s ‘stand’ on the tarmac.

Kasane Airport

Next is a shot of an aircraft similar to ours, starting its takeoff run.

Take Off

We are finally airborne and can look back at Kasane Airport before departing south west to Pom Pom Camp.

Kasane Airport from the air

Not a lot of traffic on the highway.

Kasane to the Okavango Delta

The remainder of these aerial photos are of various parts of the delta as we approach our destination airstrip at Pom Pom Camp.

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

Okavango Delta from the air

This next shot is the airstrip that we are about to land on.

Arriving at Pom Pom Airstrip

After touchdown we were driven the short distance to the camp, crossing this rather rustic bridge on the way.

The Bridge to POm Pom

Well, we are here at last.  A couple of the passengers, including Dee, felt a little poorly during the flight, but nobody was actually air sick.  The fact is that light aircraft flying at relatively low altitude over hot terrain are bound to suffer turbulence.  It was also pretty hot in the cabin, which didn’t help.  I suffered less at I was seated ‘up front’ with the pilot and had the best external view.  In fact, I thoroughly enjoyed the flight.

I’m going to save the images of the time spent in the delta for the next post.  Please come back and have a look.

The beginning of this story can be found here.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Botswana – Day 3 The Okavango Delta (Part 1)

  1. Looking at the terrain how did the pilot feel doing these trips everyday and come to terms with the diminishing law of averages? The pictures are well clear enough to tell the story.

    Like

    • In Africa, light aircraft like this are pretty much a way of life for getting about, so I think the pilots take it in their stride. Like other continents where the population density is low, there is probably enough space for forced landings if necessary. Just don’t put it down where there are hungry cats or angry hippos. I felt pretty safe. Another issue might be the boredom of continually flying over similar terrain though. I thought the photos were worth including.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s